Friday, July 03, 2015

Hannah W. Smith's Spread of the Erotic Baptism of Post-Conversion Power: part 19 of 21 in Hannah W. Smith: Keswick Founder, Higher Life Preacher, Quaker Quietist and Universalist Heretic

Hannah W. Smith chronicled Dr. Foster’s communication of his views to herself and another lady as follows:
Never shall I forget that interview. He began by telling us that “The Baptism of the Holy Spirit” was a physical thing, felt by deligthful thrills going through you from head to foot . . . and that this had been revealed to him in the following manner. He had been praying to the Lord to give him the Baptism . . . and he found that whenever he prayed especially earnestly he had physical thrills which he had thought belonged to earthly passions. He blamed himself exceedingly for this, and thought what a sensual man he must be, that in his most sacred moments such feelings should come. . . . One day . . . an inward voice seemed to say “These sensations you so much condemn are really the divine touch of the Holy Spirit in your body.” . . . Immediately, he said, he began to receive them with thankfulness and the result was that they had become so continuous that there was scarcely a moment in his life without them. . . . My friend and I had not dared to say a word while this revelation was being made to us, and when Dr. Foster left us we sat for a long while in dumbfounded silence.[1]
Hannah Whitall Smith described how their family adopted Mr. Foster’s abominable doctrine and communicated it to others:
I was seeking to know all that could be known of the “life hid with Christ in God,” and was hungering and thirsting after an expression of entire consecration and perfect trust. . . . I had also a very mystical side to my nature which longed for direct revelations from God . . . and for many years I sought in every direction to find a satisfaction for this craving. . . . The beginning of it was was in the year 1871 or ’72, when my husband needed a course of treatment for a nervous breakdown.  We took our family to a Hydropathic Sanatorium in New York State, and we stayed there for three or four months. . . . A very dear friend of mine was staying in the Sanatorium at the same time;  and as we were both hungering and thirsting to know the deep things of God, we very often had long conversations about it.  One day she said to me, “Hannah, I believe that Dr. [Henry Foster] knows some secrets of the divine life that thee and I ought to know:  he has hinted as much to me when he has been seeing me about my health.  Wouldn’t thee like to have him tell us?”  Of course I agreed to this with all my heart, and she decided to ask him.  When I next saw her she said she had asked him, and he had told her that he would ask the Lord whether he was to reveal the secret to us or not.  A few days later he told my friend that he had received permission from the Lord to tell us the secret, and he fixed a time when were were to meet to hear it. . . . Never shall I forget that interview.  He began by telling us that the Baptism of the Holy Spirit was a physical thing, felt by delightful thrills going through you from head to foot, and that no one could really know what the Baptism of the Spirit was who did not experience these thrills.  He said that this had been revealed to him in the following manner.  He had been praying the Lord to give him the Baptism of the Holy Spirit, and he found that whenever he prayed especially earnestly he had physical thrills which he thought belonged to earthly passions.  He blamed himself exceedingly for this, and thought what a sensual man he must be that in his most sacred moments such feelings should come.  By fasting and prayer he would get deliverance, as he thought, and would then begin to pray again for the Baptism of the Holy Spirit, but invariably, after a short time of prayer, the sensations would return, and the same process of fasting and prayer would have to be gone through.  As this happened over and over he was at last almost in despair.  One day, however, when, during an earnest season of prayer, these sensations were particularly strong, an inward voice seemed to say, “These sensations which you so much condemn are really the divine touch of the Holy Spirit in your body.”  He said it was very hard for him to believe this, but it seemed to come with such divine authority that he dared not reject it.  He asked specially for a sign that if it really were that Baptism of the Spirit for which he had been praying it might be made so plain to him that there could be no mistake.  And this prayer, he said, had been unmistakably answered, and he had been convinced beyond a shadow of a doubt that these very sensations, which he had condemned as being of the flesh, were actually the very Baptism of Spirit that he had longed for.  Immediately, he said, he began to receive them with thankfulness, and the result was that they had become so continuous that there was hardly a moment in his life without them, and that he had found the greatest spiritual enlightenment and uplifting from the moment that he allowed himself to receive these sensations as being the touch of the Lord.  This he told us was the divine secret which had been revealed to him, and which he was permitted to tell chosen souls.  He urged us to take the subject before the Lord in prayer, and ask Him to enlighten us, and he warned us not to let carnal thoughts concerning this blessed experience come in to blind our eyes to the divine realities it embodied.  My friend and I had not dared to say a word while this revelation was being made to us, and when Dr. [Foster] left we sat for a long while in dumbfounded silence. . . . [W]e had such absolute confidence in the holiness of this saint of God, as he seemed to us, that we were afraid our horror at what he had told us must be because we were too carnally minded, as he had said, to be able to see the deep spiritual purity of it all, and we felt that we dared not reject it without further prayer and consideration.  We had several further talks with Dr. [Foster] about it, and he told us these “baptisms” were really the fulfilment of the union between Christ and His people as the Bridegroom and the bride, described in Ephesians v, 25-32, and typified in the Song of Solomon, and declared in many parts of Scripture, and that to reject it was to reject union with the Lord Himself.  And he described this spiritual union as being so enrapturing and uplifting, and so full of the Lord’s actual presence, that at last we began to believe there must be something in it, and to long to know for ourselves the reality of this wonderful consecration.  We could not accept all the details of the experience that Dr. [Foster] gave us,[2] but we did begin to believe that there was a physical “touch” of God, that manifested itself in a bewildering delicious sensation of a sort of magnetic thrill of divine life pouring through both soul and body, which lifted one up into an enrapturing realization of oneness with Christ and that this was the true ‘Baptism of the Holy Ghost.’  We came to the conclusion that it must be what all the old mystics had known, and that it was the true inner meaning of that Union with Christ for which saints of all ages had longed, and into the realization of which so many of them seemed to have entered.  And we both began earnestly to seek to know it for ourselves. . . . I [thought] that now at last I had found the key that would open to me the door of this mystic region of divine union.  As usual, when I was interested in anything, my friends had to become interested too, and to all with whom I dared to touch on such a sacred, yet delicate, subject, I tried to tell what Dr. [Foster] had told us.  And in several instances, both in England and America, those I told of it receved the baptism I described, and in each case this very baptism was the opening up for them of a life of union and communion with God far beyond anything they had ever known before. . . . In many instances the receiving of it by preachers was the beginning of great revivals in their churches, and was, in fact, the initiation of a great deal of the “Holiness” movement of thirty years ago [that is, the time when the Keswick and Higher Life theology was originated and promulgated].  This movement took hold of the upper classes, and the meetings were largely composed of the aristocracy and the rich and influential people in English Society.  There was nothing sectarian in the whole [Keswick] movement;  no one was asked, or in any way influenced, to leave the Church to which they belonged . . . one of the marvellous features of it was the union of people of all forms of belief, and of all denominational relationships[.] . . . Dogmas and doctrines were of no account, and were never referred to, for they were not needed in the region in which this movement was carried on.  It was the region of personal experience[.] . . . But while great spiritual blesings have seemed often to be the result of this experience of union with God, very disastrous outward falls from purity and righteousness have sometimes followed[.][3]
Hannah Smith, thus, both adopted and promulgated the erotic Baptism doctrine and explained that it was at the root of the Holiness, Higher Life, or Keswick movement.
Hannah Whitall Smith further explained, through a representative example, how she spread Dr. Foster’s filthy doctrine to others, and its effects upon them:
One day, not long after our [Mr. & Mrs. Smith’s] stay at the New York sanatarium, I [met] . . . a very strict Friend [Quaker] . . . a most successful Christian worker, but rather self-absorbed.  She . . . dressed in the strictest fashion of sugar-scoop bonnets, crossed handkerchiefs, with a dainty three-cornered shawl over her shoulders.  We became very intimate[.] . . . She was very religious, and we soon discovered that we were both seekers after the mystic life, and especially after the baptism of the Holy Ghost, and we embraced every opportunity we could find of seeking for it together.
        At that time some Methodists who believed in sanctification by faith were in the habit of holding in the summer what were called Holiness Camp Meetings . . . led by prominent religious preachers and teachers who believed in the doctrine of Holiness, or, in other words, of “sanctification by faith.” . . . [T]he friend of whom I speak and I myself, with a large company of congenial friends, attended one of these Camp Meetings, all of us hungering and thirsting . . . to know experimentally the conscious baptism of the Holy Spirit.  The whole camp ground was exercised on this subject, and in almost every meeting wonderful testimonies would be given by those who had, as they believed, consciously received it.
        Our expectations and our longings were wrought up to the highest ptich of enthusiasim, and one evening, after the public meeting under the trees was over, a few of us gathered in one tent for a special prayer meeting on the subject, determined to wrestle and agonize until the answer came.  We knelt in the dark, and poured out our prayers and supplications . . . for two or three hours. . . . As the company passed out of the tent, I noticed my friend did not pass out with them, and I wondered whether she had slipped out silently before the meeting closed and gone back to her own tent.  I lighted a candle to go to bed, when, to my astonishment, I found her lying across the foot of my bed in what appeared to be a swoon.  I spoke to her, and immediately she began to praise God in the most rapturous way:  “Oh, how wonderful!  Oh, how glorious!  Oh, this is the Baptism!  Oh, what a blessing;  ’tis more than I can bear!  Oh, Lord, stay Thy hand! Flesh and blood cannot bear this glory!”[4]  And similar exclamations burst from her lips in tones of ecstasy.  As may be imagined, I was overwhelmed with awe and delight, and I immediately rushed out to call in my friends to see the wonderful answer to our prayers, for I could not doubt that my friend had received the baptism of the Holy Spirit for which we were all longing.  Why she had been picked out, I could not imagine, for she was not, as far as I knew, a bit better or a bit more earnest than any of the rest of us.  However, there it was . . . [a] little awestruck company gathered round the bed, and eagerly drank in all her rapturous exclamations, afraid almost to breathe for fear that we should disturb the heavenly visitation.  After a while she seemed to recover from her swoon sufficiently to go to her own tent, and, although very tottering and scarcely able to walk, we managed to take her there and get her undressed and into bed. . . . [E]arly in the morning I sent word to the early Prayer Meeting of the great blessing that had come to the camp ground.  Immediately a deputation of the leaders of the meeting came to the tent to ask my friend whether she would not come to their large meeting and bear testimony to the blessing that had been bestowed upon her. . . . It was one of the foundation principles among believers in the definite baptism of the Holy Spirit that if you did not confess it when you had received it, it might be lost[.][5] . . . [The baptism] seemed to have been what the Swedenborgians[6] call “her opening into the spiritual world,” for from that time she began to have very strange and wonderous experiences . . . [which made] ordinary religious life very humdrum and uninteresting[.] . . . I told her of my experience at the water-cure [Henry Foster’s hydropathic sanitarium], and of the secret that had there been revealed to me[.]  [S]he immediatley seized upon it . . . and went to this same water-cure, and put herself under the teaching of the doctor there[.] . . . She embraced all his views, and felt led, as she fully believed by the Holy Spirit, to great lengths in the lines he taught.  Among other things, she felt her duty to ask him to stand naked before her, and also to do the same thing herself before him.  To what other lengths she went I have never known, but she was fully imbued with the idea that the baptism of the Holy Spirit was physical as well as spiritual, and that the great aim of religious teachers should be to excite in themselves and in others those physical thrills which accompany passion, and which she had come to believe were the manifest token of union with Christ.  She took the Song of Solomon to be the exposition of the relation between the soul and Christ as the Bride and Bridegroom, and she confessed to me with great awe that she really believed that Christ had often come to her at night when in bed as the real Bridegroom, and had actually had a bridegroom’s connextion with her.  She taught this doctrine to a choice circle of friends, and even tried by personal contact to produce in them those physical thrills which she believed were the actual contact of the Holy Ghost.  She overawed these friends by the tremendous force of her own convictions, and in many cases obtained . . . control over them, so that they were not surprised or shocked at anything she did or said, but accepted it all as from God, and as being the avenue through which the Holy Ghost was to be poured out upon them . . . [although] the person who was acknowledged by all to be the most full of self was my friend [herself], who had apparently received the Baptism. [7]
Hannah had written to her husband:  “There does seem to be a truth in it [Dr. Foster’s doctrine], and I feel as if it would be a great means of restoration to health to thee if thee could get fully into it.  Do try.”[8]  With the leading of Dr. Foster and the encouragement of Hannah his wife, then, Robert P. Smith received such an erotic baptism, and having “received the baptism of the Spirit . . . he began to teach, preach, and propagate”[9] the Higher Life theology publicly and the mystic baptism privately, leading many[10] into a post-conversion Spirit baptism and the thrills of the marriage-bed that allegedly accompanied it.  For example, one of Robert’s first English disciples, a woman called Lizzie Lumb, wrote Robert a series of letters between 1873 and 1875 describing the physical sensations of her “Betrothal with [a false] Christ”:
The thrill commences in the love nerves, with a great throbbing, as though a heart beat there, and rises to the regions of the chest, with a thrill and sweet confusion of union[.] . . . Most earnestly do I thank you for revealing such treasures to me, as you have in this mystery of the heavenly marriage.[11]
Hannah Smith recognized that adoption of the Bridal Baptism doctrine led to the free acceptance and practice of sexual debauchery, or at least something very close to it.[12]  For instance, as a consequence of Robert’s preaching at one meeting, Hannah W. Smith narrated:  “Boole got a great Baptism during the meeting, the unmentionable kind, and was so completely carried away by it . . . that he came near to making love to me, and actually did get into a deep and spiritual flirtation with a lady there who had left her husband because of his ill usage.”[13]  Likewise, Hannah W. Smith recounts:
I knew one dear lady who began in the purest and simplest way to give herself up to these emotions, and gradually came to spending most of her time allowing these waves of thrills to flow through her from head to foot, believing that she was in this way realizing more and more the presence of the Lord, and coming more and more into actual union with Him.  And the result was most disastrous in destroying her moral nature, and launching her into a course of impurity from which in the beginning she would have shrunk with horror.[14]
One must not be surprised that the infinitely holy and pure Holy Ghost would give over to their lusts (Romans 1:26) those who would defile His Holy Name by associating such things with His baptism.  Certainly such supernatural manifestations as the erotic Baptism were manifestations of the god of this world, the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that works in and energizes the children of disobedience, the infernal Power behind Robert and Hannah W. Smith’s theology of sanctification and “Christian” living.  Robert believed in his erotic Baptism “as late as 1878,”[15] that is, until he gave up Christianity entirely, for he “thought that it was a very precious truth.”[16]



This entire study can be accessed here.




[1]              Pgs. 34-35, Remarkable Relations, Barbara Strachey.  Strachey’s book supplies ample difficult to obtain original source material.
[2]              Hannah Smith publicly claimed that, at least at this time, she did not accept Dr. Foster’s teaching in every detail;  she admits only that others did.  For example, Hannah wrote about what had happened when she had explained their experiences at Dr. Foster’s sanatorium to a friend, Quaker minister Sarah F. Smiley:
When I told her of my experiences at the water cure [Dr. Foster’s hydropathic sanatorium] . . . she seized upon it . . . putting herself under the teaching of the doctor there, hoping that she might learn his strange secrets. The result was that she went into the wildest extravagences. . . . Among other things she felt it her duty to ask him to stand naked before her, and also to do the same thing herself before him. To what other lengths she went I have never known. . . . She really believed that Christ had often come to her at night when in bed, as the real Bridegroom, and had actually had a bridegroom’s connection with her. She taught this doctrine to a choice circle of friends and even tried by personal contact to produce in them those physical thrills which she believed were the actual contact of the Holy Ghost. (pg. 39, Remarkable Relations, Strachey)
However, in her narrative above, in order to make herself look better, Hannah distances herself and understates her influence in leading Sarah Smiley into the erotic Baptism heresy.  Elsewhere, in a writing which was only to be circulated posthumously and in which she attempted to conceal the identify of Dr. Foster, Hannah admitted that she was the immediate instrument of Sarah’s entering into the erotic experience:
Another friend of mine . . . whom I had told about Dr. R., received while I was talking to her, what she believed was the Baptism, and began to experience right there thrills of rapture from head to foot, which completely carried her away. . . . [S]he [came] to spend most of her time lying on the sofa trying to induce [the thrills] to come.  She also . . . felt it her duty to kiss several men, with the idea that through that means God would bestow either great blessings upon them or greater blessings upon herself.  She had felt led to kiss Mr. L. [the Methodist sexual predator discussed above]. . . . [Indeed,] a great many saintly women . . . one after another . . . would in some mysterious way begin to “feel led” to give him a kiss . . . the called for kiss bestowed . . . floods of joy and peace would fill their souls. . . . She was impressed with the idea that through this performance God would bestow the Baptism of the Spirit upon the receipient of her kisses. . . . [She] was so good and pure minded that we all called her “Saint Sarah[.]”  . . . This dear Saint was so enmoured of what she called “The Touch of God,” that she spent a large part of her time seeking for it and enjoying it, until it finally became a sort of possession . . . a very good Christian lady . . . said . . . [she] was possessed of the devil. (pgs. 194-202, 246-248, Religious Fanaticism, Strachey)
Smiley became part of what was known as the “Boston Party,” following the “outgrowth of Dr. Foster’s idea.”  Smiley testified that the Boston Party was “far ahead of all other Holiness meetings she has ever attended in spirituality, direct guidance, etc.” (Letter to Robert, December 4, 1873, reproduced in the entry for July 8 of The Christian’s Secret of a Holy Life, Hannah W. Smith, ed. Dieter).  Smiley also set forth the typical Higher Life and Keswick allegorization of the book of Joshua, including a doctrine of post-conversion Spirit baptism, in her The Fulness of Blessing; or, The Gospel of Christ, as Illustrated from the Book of Joshua (London:  Hodder & Stoughton, 1876).  It is noteworthy, in light of Hannah’s revelations of Smiley’s activities with Dr. Foster, that Smiley’s discussion of post-conversion Spirit baptism allegorically eisegeted into Joshua includes an extensive note decrying the “tendency to ignore the importance of the body, [which] proceeds from a general lack of insight into the Scriptural philosophy of nature and of spirit” (pg. 89).
Of course, Boston was the place from which the Faith and Mind Cures of Dr. Cullis and Mary Baker Eddy spread in the background of Higher Life teaching, rejection of sola Scriptura, fanaticism, and demonism.
[3]              Pgs. 165-172, Religious Fanaticism, Strachey.
[4]              Compare Hannah Smith’s description of her related experience near Clifton Springs through her surrender to the Inward Voice in her Letter to Sisters of August 14, 1879, reproduced in the entry for September 19 of The Christian’s Secret of a Holy Life, ed. Dieter.
[5]              This principle that blessings not confessed immediately were lost carried over to the foundational pre-Keswick Conventions, into the Keswick movement, and into the Pentecostal and Word of Faith movements;  thus, e. g., the Oxford Convention proclaimed:  “None retain the blessing of full faith [the Higher Life], and its consequent victory, who refuse to acknowledge, on suitable occasions, what God has done for them.  The saintly John Fletcher four times fell back into the old level by fearing to witness for this grace of God” (pgs. 284-285, Account of the Union Meeting for the Promotion of Scriptural Holiness, Held at Oxford, August 29 to September 7, 1874. Chicago:  Revell, 1874).  Fletcher was the central theologian of Wesleyan Perfectionism (see, e. g, “How John Fletcher Became the Theologian of Wesleyan Perfectionism, 1770–1776,” T. L. Smith. Wesleyan Theological Journal 15:1 (Spring 1980): 68–87).
[6]              Swedenborgianism is another demonic and spiritualist cult that Hannah W. Smith viewed in a positive light, as did, among others, Mr. and Mrs. Mount-Temple.
[7]              Pgs. 173-181, Religious Fanaticism, Strachey.
[8]              pg. 38, Remarkable Relations, Strachey,  citing a letter from October 21, 1873.  Hannah later became less enthusiastic about Dr. Foster’s doctrine and then rejected it, but her husband continued to believe and promulgate it secretly until it caused his public downfall.
[9]              Pg. 317, The Puritans:  Their Origins and Successors, D. M. Lloyd-Jones.  Robert had earlier received entire sanctification and a less erotic spiritual Baptism at a Methodist Holiness meeting, where he learned that “one can be sanctified by faith just as one was saved by faith” (February 5-6, The Christian’s Secret of a Holy Life, Hannah W. Smith, ed. Dieter).
[10]            The doctrine was a regular theme of Robert P. Smith, and many adopted it as a result of his propagation of it; cf. pgs. 233-234, 238, 251, 255-260, 466-467, 470, Record of the Convention for the Promotion of Scriptural Holiness Held at Brighton, May 29th to June 7th, 1875. Brighton: W. J. Smith, 1875.
[11]            Pg. 39, Remarkable Relations, Strachey.
[12]            Pg. 48, Remarkable Relations, Strachy; cf. pg. 104.
[13]            Pg. 50, Remarkable Relations, Strachey.  This meeting took place in 1876 under Robert Smith’s preaching at a camp meeting in the United States after his downfall in England.  Note that Robert was still, obviously, promulgating the doctrine of the erotic Baptism even after being forced to leave England after the Brighton Convention because of it.
Other manifestations of fanaticism ascribed to the Holy Spirit at another camp meeting the Smiths graced were similar to those experienced by early Quakerism:  “The ladies . . . at our house this spring have that quaking under the power of the Spirit that gave the early Friends the name of Quakers.  Mrs. Ashmead and Mrs. Bond both quake wonderfully at times.  And yet neither of them are at all remarkable for any depth of natural character” (pgs. 51-52, ibid.).
[14]            Pg. 162, Religious Fanaticism, Strachey.
[15]            Pg. 36, The Keswick Story, Polluck.
[16]          Letter to a Friend, February 12, 1876, reproduced in the entry for July 30 of The Christian’s Secret of a Holy Life, Hannah W. Smith, ed. Dieter.

5 comments:

Doulos said...

Are you sure you aren't documenting some current belief and practice? Feels like a "Christian" attempt at the practices from the heathen temples of Artemis and such in the ancient world. I'm thinking there are those that would or will gladly rediscover and promote this religious experience and, in this day and age, not have to be so covert about it. Anyway. Yuck. Glad there are only 2 more parts, and I've only actually read the last 2 or 3.

Lessons learned:
"an inward voice seemed to say"
rather than the Bible FIRST giving us our doctrine and weighing those inward voices against that rather than vice versa.

"Immediately, he said, he began to receive them with thankfulness,"
again, experience and "truth" from self being the source of doctrine

"She overawed these friends by the tremendous force of her own convictions, and in many cases obtained . . . control over them, so that they were not surprised or shocked at anything she did or said, but accepted it all as from God"
our gullibility, our lack of questioning and proving things, our hero-worship rather than God-worship, the numbing of our conscience...

"[which made] ordinary religious life very humdrum and uninteresting"
forsaking that "simplicity of the Gospel"...common failing in the church...leading to nowhere good...

"And the result was most disastrous in destroying her moral nature, and launching her into a course of impurity from which in the beginning she would have shrunk with horror."
Her logic, from her already excused sin, being turned into illogic and pathetic hilarity. As if the PRACTICE, in conflict with clear scripture, wasn't already a choice to destroy the moral nature and impurity. Why is this reminding me of our current religious scene...and where it has led...what once shocked us, we now laugh at or ho hum at, or even celebrate...and participation is next.

Here's the whole problem in a paragraph:
"[W]e had such absolute confidence in the holiness of this saint of God, as he seemed to us, that we were afraid our horror at what he had told us must be because we were too carnally minded, as he had said, to be able to see the deep spiritual purity of it all, and we felt that we dared not reject it without further prayer and consideration."

And finally, think of all the other clear scriptures they had to defy to make their own "proof texts" work.

Deja vous, and deja vous.

KJB1611 said...

Dear Doulos,

Thanks for the comment. I agree that it is really gross, and that there are lessons about gullability, etc.. Also, Mr. and Mrs. Pearsall Smith founded the Keswick theology, which is extremely influential in Baptist fundamentalism and in other circles of Christendom, and advocates of the Higher Life system really ought to know what their founders believed. Also, Pentecostal historians have traced their "tongues" speech and Spirit baptism doctrine to Mrs. Smith, so Pentecostals ought to know about her also, especially as the Keswick movement prepared the way for Pentecostalism.

kddlporter said...

1 of 2 "Also, Mr. and Mrs. Pearsall Smith founded the Keswick theology, which is extremely influential in Baptist fundamentalism & in other circles of Christendom, and advocates of the Higher Life system really ought to know what their founders believed." ---Really? Perhaps in Evangelical Fundamentalism....but hardly of the Baptist stream save that polluted & corrupted, no longer separated to God & from that world catholicity Reformed & Roman! This is simply another outworking of the Great Whore idolatry of Goddess-Godman Babylonianism, & the Gentile churches were solemnly warned not to boast over the failure & idolatry of Israel as though superior & immune to it themselves in Romans 11. Though the impure spirit sought & succeeded to make inroads in portions of baptistic tradition as in all apostasizing Christendom of which the Baptist stream was never fully joined to or absorbed into, the separate Bible Baptists were aware of the strange spirit & impurity of it, & some bravely & faithfully warred against it, along with sacramentalism & nicolaitanism lending itself to hero worship, persecution & bondage to traditional Old World tyranny as James Beller has well documented. The traps of 1 Cor 1-4, Colossians 2, 2 Cor 11 & Rev 17& 18 are hardly populated solely by 'baptists'! ------ Long ages and evolutionism sprang of this same spirit & urge of fleshly gain, self-trust & experience unresisted (2 Peter 2, James 4 etc), and the Enlightenment Rationalistic idolatry & antinomianism was received to various degrees by the intelligentsia of Harvard & Princeton early on, as well as at Brown (infiltrated & influenced at a later date --as McCoy noted to his shock & chagrin by their evolutionary naturalism-influenced treatment of his native American preacher boys). Be honest & don't play games rewriting history.

kddlporter said...

2 of 3 ... Both the fundamentalists Hodge & B.B. Warfield caved to the deconstructing, demoralizing impure spiritual influence in evolutionary philosophy, & even rewrote the doctrine of biblical preservation & inerrancy to fit with it. Both Theodore Roosevelt & Woodrow Wilson's connection to this stream is well-known, as is Presbyterianism's elitist & tyrannical tendencies turned to sexual, racist & commercial exploitation justified by their common ground with elitist evolutionary euthanasia promotors such as Sanger & her powerful elite backers driven by the same 2 Peter 2, & Revelation 17&18 spirit. Secular historians may interpret the times & the reasons for them wrongly, having willingly swallowed evolution as their excuse & justification for sin hook, line & sinker -----their vain vomit & wallows 'dream' of 2 Peter 2&3 'hope' of mockers -----but they are often more honest about the actual events of history than many Reformed & nicolaitan higher critical 'Christian heritage' types seeking to 'cover' for heroes & traditions having nothing to do with Christ or the faith once delivered, though naming both ----- & who speak out of both sides of their mouths with just as much ease, & with far less excuse having knowledge of the scriptures & the historical faith.

kddlporter said...

3 of 3 ----------Consider the refusal of 'Scientific Creation Ministries' to honestly discuss Erasmus Darwin's influence on his grandson's supposedly 'new' idea: his affinity for erotic poetry & Enlightenment philosophy rooted in kabala and pagan sorcery, influencing his 'skepticism' and 'Zoonomia', his 'Hellfire Club' & scientific society connections. Consider the refusal to honestly address these issues as they relate to the Bible revision issue & Rome, and consider the stubborn insistence to include Unitarians & other cultists as part of our 'great Christian heritage' without distinguishing their doctrinal characteristics & departures from biblical faith, while naming adherents of these cults in the list of supposed 'Christian' heroes without disclosing their Unitarianism, cultism or their published & stated goals for infiltrating Evangelical unions for missions & Bible translation work, relating to science etc! ---- not to mention leaving the Jesuits non-distinguished & camouflaged! I recommend Jason Cooley's recent sermon at sermonaudio.com on 'The Bible and Birth Control' for starters on some straight-shooting history pertinent to Keswick & the connected & consequential issues bringing righteous judgment to America today ----there are others there just as pertinent. These are things from which few, if any of us---are absolutely free of having wholly or partially swallowed, been influenced by or participated in before & as God has brought us to our senses & to Himself, calling & drawing us out of the world, sanctifying us by the grace of the word & the Holy Ghost insofar as we yield ourselves to His good will as opposed to His strange work. It is a time for humility. A time for self-examination & sober reflection. A time for repentance & return: for weeping, wailing & mourning; for sackcloth & ashes--- for crying out to God for forgiveness & revival ----not a time for pride & puffing, for blame and Luke 16 justifying of self before men. I'm just another fallible human being, but on the authority of scripture, I can assure you that God is not impressed by self-serving, blame-shifting dialectics, & that judgment does not sleep. Psalm 2. Isaiah 8. Ezekiel 22 & 44. James 4. The spirit of drunkenness & impurity, & the blood of the saints is found in her & it is time for God's people to come out that they do not further share in her plagues, or her ultimate destruction. Revelation 17 & 18.