Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Should I Blog?

Within this last year, someone approached me, who I believe really cares, to tell me he didn't think I should blog.  It related mainly to church autonomy, that pastors will have to deal with problems at a time not of their choice, because of what their members will read here. I might be 100% true and truthful, but the people receiving it will not get it in the right manner if they obtain it other than just in their church.  I didn't agree.  I'm not going to argue for my position here.  I have several arguments for.  I think I should blog.  However, I want to hear from those who also think I either should or shouldn't.  I want to hear, either way.

I've got one rule.  You must be respectful when you give your comments or I won't publish them. Please, however, give them.  I do want to hear/read them pro or con.

Thank you.

13 comments:

KJB1611 said...

By blogging, you are getting truth out to the world, which is very good. Nothing in the Bible states that one should restrict truth and not put it out to the world because of the order in which somebody might hear it. Were this objection employed consistently, it would be an argument against Bible commentaries, and even of personal Bible study. The blog here has influenced many for good; keep it up!

Anonymous said...

There are indeed times with information hits us at a time that is inconvenient, and in regard to a church, someone might get some info from your site at a time that actually adds to the stress of some on-going situation in another church. (But any blog / website can do that, not just yours.) There is no insulation from that, and God's people simply need to rely on Him and His timing and respond rightly to what they know when they know it. There is a time to blog and a time not to blog. There is a time to read good blogs and a time not to read any blogs.

I think that your site and writings are generally very useful, even for your critics. I can see a time when you might need to pause your writing or there might be a higher priority, but I don't think the reason mentioned is persuasive.

I have been blessed by much I've read here, and I hope much more Christ-honoring writing will come from those keystrokes (yours and Thomas Ross' and the thoughtful posters of comments)!

E. T. Chapman

George Calvas said...

You are hypocritical to your "local only position". Keep it to yourself for the body of Christ, the church, needs to hear from those who are not hypocritical but preach both the local assembly as well as, "there is only one body", the church. If one preaches "autonomy", then he should not spend hours and hours on blogs, rather than hours and hours with his "autonomous church family".

Therefore, keep biblical matters "personal" begin consistent to your beliefs.

GC

JIM CAMP said...

I hope you continue to blog. It is useful information, & I have learned much. I see the man's argument, but would this also mean he cannot have a guest speaker in his church (or at least necessitate that he give him a list of approved subjects)?

Thanks for all the info.

David Barnhart said...

Your members will also hear second hand of things you have preached in other venues, but that doesn't mean you should stop that either.

If you believe you have things to say/argue/present that are of value, then those things can be as much value to those not in your church, as long as they are not topics specific to your church. I appreciate those who take the time to blog, because I can read much that I otherwise would never know, and much of it makes me think and helps to sharpen me.

Andrew Hemingway said...

Your blogging has been a blessing to me and has aided in my "growing in knowledge" of Biblical doctrine. The logic used to make the statement that Christians should not be adding to their knowledge outside of the the churches regularly scheduled services seems faulty on its face. Following this faulty logic would lead you to discouraging all personal Bible study, all personal conversation with other christians who might ask spiritual questions, it leads to a unbiblical view and role of the local church.
I hope you will continue to blog to honor of Him that saved you.

Lance Ketchum said...

Speak at the widest level of influence possible. If you say something with which someone might disagree, if they cannot defend their own position before their local church, they really do not have a position - just an opinion.

Terry Basham, II said...

click bait... lol

JMark said...

Paul preached to churches and his writings were passed around the churches. Im not saying your writings are inspired by God, but I do believe there is a principle set forth to share truth with other churches and their members, whether in person or not.

Tyler Robbins said...

Blog. Baptists need to have articulate voices. You are an articulate spokesman for your positions, and they need to be heard - especially if people disagree with you.

Blog on!

Mark Sennes said...

I hope this doesn't come across as disrespectful, but it seems to me that withholding spiritual light and truth is the goal of Satan and his followers, not of God's children. We ought to rejoice and be thankful whenever truth is revealed to us, whether or not it is a convenient time. I have learned much from this blog during the past few years, and the focus on scriptural doctrine and practice has been a tremendous encouragement to me. It seems like the church autonomy argument only appears when a compromising pastor is being reproved and his error being exposed. I have no sympathy for pastors that are afraid to be respectfully challenged by scriptural truth. Let there be light!

Mark Sennes

John Mark IB said...

Dear Gentlemen good morning hope you are doing well! Sorry just thought I'd let you know that there seems to be a problem with Dr Thomas Ross web site there is an error when trying to get into it and the pages see here for screen shot and have a blessed day and weekend
Can't put the screen shot for some reason sorry it says 403 forbidden error

Bill Hardecker said...

Judging from the content of your blog articles, I sure hope you would continue to blog. I see a valor and candor about how you engage readers in the comment section which provides a healthy discussion forum. I personally see no reason to stop blogging. I see you challenging and being challenged. If what you write poses a problem to other men, I don't understand how stopping you from blogging would lighten or ease up the conundrum given the blogosphere much less the internet. Isn't part of ministry actually enduring afflictions? Not saying your blog is an affliction. Certainly, many folks are no longer enduring sound doctrine, that's for sure.